No. 1062 - Launceston - Elizabeth Street Salvation Army Citadel (2011)

Launceston’s Salvation Army Corps, established in 1883, is one of the oldest corps in country and the first established in Tasmania. The history of the early years of the Corps has been the focus of a previous article on ‘Churches of Tasmania’. [See No. 320]. This short follow-up article is focused on the past decade, which has seen a new ‘citadel’ built, the third building constructed on the Elizabeth Street site.

In 2011 Launceston’s Salvation Army Corp undertook a multimillion-dollar redevelopment of its 125-year-old site in Elizabeth Street. The project was the first redevelopment of the premises since the 1960s. The cost of the $4 million project was mitigated by the use of voluntary labour and the sale of a number of Salvation Army properties. Prior to the commencement of the project, an adjoining block of land had been purchased which allowed for a larger building.

During building works the Salvation Army’s weekly church fellowship activities moved to the former Lawrence Vale Road Uniting Church while Sunday services were held at the Launceston Church Grammar School auditorium.

The new Elizabeth Street Citadel has a 400-seat auditorium, kitchen and an indoor- outdoor cafe as well as more interview and assessment spaces, staff offices and a dedicated children's area. The building was officially opened in 2012.

The new Salvation Army premises on Elizabeth Street. (photo 2019)



The second Citadel built on Elizabeth Street in the late 1960s. Source: The Salvation Army Museum

The first Citadel, visible on the left, was still in use in the 1960s. Source: The salvation Army Museum.


Sources:

Launceston Examiner, 2 February 2011.

https://www.utas.edu.au/library/companion_to_tasmanian_history/S/Salvation%20army.htm


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