No. 1376 - Mawbanna - All Saints' Anglican Church (1967)

Mawbanna is a small community in the Circular Head region as is situated about 40 kilometres southeast of Smithton. The Arthur River forms the southern boundary of the Mawbanna district while the Black River forms a part of the western boundary. “Mawbanna” is an Aboriginal word for “black”. The last known thylacine to be killed in the wild was shot in Mawbanna in 1930.

All Saints' Anglican church is a relatively recent addition to Mawbanna; opening in May 1967. However, the building is about 150 years old and has been moved several times. Its first location was on the west side of the Black River where it Erected in the 1870s. It was then moved to the east side of the river and a chancel was added at this time. In 1935 it was moved to South Forest where it remained before it was moved to Mawbanna. When it was moved to Mawbanna in 1967 a porch and vestry was added to the building. The history at the church at Black River and South Forest will be the subject of further articles on ‘Churches of Tasmania’.

Although no longer an Anglican church the building is still used for regular church services.

Former All Saints' Anglican Church at Mawbanna. Photograph courtesy of Karina Barker

Former All Saints' Anglican Church at Mawbanna. Photograph courtesy of Karina Barker


Former All Saints' Anglican Church at Mawbanna. Photograph courtesy of Karina Barker



Sources:

Henslowe, Dorothea I & Hurburgh, Isa Our heritage of Anglican churches in Tasmania. Mercury-Walch, Moonah, Tas, 1978.

Stephens, Geoffrey & Anglican Church of Australia. Diocese of Tasmania, (issuing body.) The Anglican Church in Tasmania : a Diocesan history to mark the sesquicentenary, 1992. Trustees of the Diocese, Hobart, 1991.



 

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